1st WINNER 2012 – STEPHANE MALKA
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“EMPTIES (KY)”, Curated by Paola Gentili.
Stephane Malka from France for the artwork “Empties (ky)”, curated by Paola Gentili.
Empties(ky) is a neologism standing for ky (kyphoscoliosis peptidase), a cythoskeleton necessary to the muscular growth of the human organism and empties standing for voids and lakings. As for Greece and the antic myths overthrow, from the Minoan civilization to the economic upheaval that we all knows about..

Empty Sky. The Olympus is outkast.
Santorini, the cannibal Island, a possible Atlantis, has been sunken by its own Volcano is the magnificent prototype of those Greek tragedies. It’s a vernacular dialogue, a viral white on white growing on the walls and ceilings of a troglodyte habitat, composed by a single and same item demultiplied. A parasite object spreading itself to the site typology and it’s stuccoed, it’s aspirations and breathings. Empties (ky) is composed of polystyrene chips threshed along the 245 artists parcels.

Website: http://www.stephanemalka.com/en


2nd WINNER 2012 – TANJA RADEZ
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TANJA RADEZ FROM SLOVENIA FOR THE ARTWORK “GIRLS AND BOYS”, Curated by Tomas Poblete.
The spatial organization entitled ‘Girls and Boys’ is a visual reflection by Tanja Radez, tracking in a part of her creative activity the visual remains of the recent past of her non-existent country Yugoslavia. ‘Girls and Boys’ is a project dealing with early childhood games that are based on an exploratory attitude to collecting something. In Yugoslavia, one after the other the girls were collecting napkins and boys were collecting album stickers. The paper napkins, thinner than the wind, have remained forever imprinted in the girls’ subconscious memory.


3rd WINNER 2012 – STIPAN TADIC
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STIPAN TADIC FROM CROATIA FOR THE ARTWORK “GRANDFATHER”, CURATED BY TRACEY HOLT WALKDEN, ALEXA KUSBER, PAOLA GENTILI AND TOMAS POBLETE.
The face by itself captures memories and from the looks of a face one can see everything the person has gone true. I have tried to make the psychology, one can read out of the lines of a face, even more obvious by over sizing the portraits and putting the face and the gaze in focus. I also put three shades of blue into the background which symbolize three parts of the day oppositely to the three phases of life we have on the portraits. All portraits are done with the help of little squares which were painted 5 a day. They are painted with little brushstrokes where I paid much attention to detail. If we look closely, we can find on each portrait hidden between the brushstrokes a little painted portrait of Mickey Mouse. By putting something unreal like Mickey onto a hyper realistic face, suggests onto the illusion that the brushstrokes make nothing but an illusion of a face and somehow “bring the curtain down” between the painter and the viewer. So I am dealing here with time on different levels , the life time, the time of a day (blue background) and the time which took to paint the paintings (5 squares a day).


4th WINNER 2012 – RUI SASAKI
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RUI SASAKI FROM JAPAN FOR THE ARTWORK “LISTEN TO MY MOM”, CURATED BY ALEXA KUSBER, TOMAS POBLETE, PAOLA GENTILI AND TRACEY HOLT WALKDEN.
I panicked and needed to conjure up the intimacy of my home. I wanted to transfer my home, parents, country and everything from Japan to where I was in the United States. The way I did this was by bringing anything that represented my home and family in Japan to the United States in the form of dust and so my mother sent me dust from Japan. We had to be careful about packaging due to inspection. She tried to hide it inside of a pretty gift box with books. Dust is toxic for humans with allergies and hiding it somehow was the only way to transport this intimacy. In this case, dust is a necessary poison. Once it was in my possession, I put the dust on a glass record and placed it on a turntable. The needle then played the dust. I could hear irregular rhythmic sounds. I also made a dust jacket for the dust record. The dust jacket was not intended to protect the record from dust but was a protection for my precious dust from back home. Maps and my family tree accompanied by stories from my mother, notes on the dust composition, and microscopic images were also assembled for the overall piece.

ARTIST STATEMENT:
…The uncanny is associated with the bringing to light of what was hidden and secret, distinguishing the uncanny from the simply fearful by defining it as that class of the terrifying which leads us back to something long known to us, once very familiar. — Sigmund Freud, The Uncanny (1919)

Rui Sasaki was born in the smallest one of the four main islands in Japan and grew up in a suburb of Tokyo. In 2002, she started studying glass in Industrial, Interior, and Craft Design Department at Musashino Art University in Japan that she did her BFA (2002-2006) and got a certificate of curator in museums. After her BFA, she was making her production work with blown glass. She came to the United States in 2007 and earned a MFA in Glass at Rhode Island School of Design (RI, the United States) in June 2010.

She is using glass as her physical and conceptual material. Her main investigation is cast glass in a space but also has started using her body as performance, utilizing video, and photography as a means of documentation using glass.

She participated some of artist in residence (AiR) programs in Sweden and the US. Recently, she was one of fellows in the CGCA in NJ and one of recipients of artist grants in Vermont Studio Center in VT, the United States. She has been working with many glass and non-glass artists as artist assistant. She taught at Rhode Island School of Design during her MFA and in Worcester Center for Crafts (Worcester State University) during her AiR. Currently, she is teaching at Kyoto University of Art and Design in Kyoto, Japan. Her work has been exhibited internationally, such as Japan, Korea, Sweden, Denmark, Australia, Italy and a number of places in the US. She moved back to Japan after spending time for 4.5 years in the US in Dec 2011. She lives in Kyoto, Japan and works both Kyoto and Mass, the US.

Website: http://rui-sasaki.com/home.html